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Get Vaccinated for the Measles in Contra Costa and Alameda Counties at STAT MED Urgent Care – No Appointment Needed

Get in LIne at STAT MED Urgent Care - LinkMeasles is a very contagious disease caused by a virus. It spreads through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. One of the reasons measles is so contagious is that measles symptoms typically start like a cold and is infectious before classic measles symptoms noticed by the patients.

How do I prevent getting the measles? Get vaccinated – and make sure your family gets vaccinated, too! 

Measles can be prevented with the MMR vaccine, which protects against three diseases: measles, mumps, and rubella. The MMR vaccine can be given to children (12month or older), teens and adults. You can get the measles (MMR) vaccine at STAT MED Urgent Care clinics in Concord, Dublin, Lafayette, and Livermore — no appointment is needed. 

Children may also get MMRV vaccine, which protects against measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (chickenpox). This vaccine is only licensed for use in children who are 12 months through 12 years of age. Please go to your child’s pediatrician for the MMRV vaccine.

How do I get vaccinated for Measles?

STAT MED Urgent Care offers the MMR vaccine in all of our San Francisco Bay Clinics: Concord, Dublin, Lafayette and Livermore. No appointment is needed. If you pre-register using our optional online registration system (www.statmed.com/locations), please note on your registration that you are coming into the clinic for the measles vaccination.

Given the current high demand for the measles vaccine due to the increasing instances of exposure in California, you may want to call your local STAT MED Urgent Care clinic to confirm same day vaccine availability first. We are constantly restocking as we run low so any wait should be minimal.

measles is contagious infographic from CDCWho should get the MMR vaccine?

CDC recommends children get two doses of MMR vaccine, starting with the first dose at 12 through 15 months of age, and the second dose at 4 through 6 years of age. Teens and adults should also be up to date on their MMR vaccination.

According to the CCD, the MMR vaccine is very safe and effective. Two doses of MMR vaccine are about 97% effective at preventing measles; one dose is about 93% effective.

Does insurance cover the cost of the Measles (MMR) vaccine?

Most health insurance plans cover the cost of recommended vaccines. But you may want to check with your health insurance provider to verify.

How do I tell if I need the measles vaccine?

Start by checking your medical records, including your immunization records.

The CDC considers you protected from measles if you have written documentation (records) showing at least one of the following:

You received two doses of measles-containing vaccine, and you are:

  • a school-aged child (grades K-12)
  • an adult who will be in a setting that poses a high risk for measles transmission, including students at post-high school education institutions, healthcare personnel, and international travelers.

You received one dose of measles-containing vaccine, and you are:

  • a preschool-aged child
  • an adult who will not be in a high-risk setting for measles transmission.
  • a laboratory confirmed that you had measles at some point in your life.
  • a laboratory confirmed that you are immune to measles. (This is typically done using a titer blood test)You were born before 1957. (Note: This is not a definitive test. It is a presumptive test based on the fact that most people born before 1957 were not otherwise protected from measles and typically got it when exposed to measles and built their own immunity to measles. Typically if you are born before 1957 you should test positive for immune antibodies to measles.)

FAQ: What are the symptoms of measles?

Measles is a very contagious disease caused by a virus. It spreads through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Measles starts about 4 days before any symptoms are noticed by the patients and that is why is so contagious.

Once a patient is infected with measles, symptoms usually start about 4 days after exposure with fever and rash, and associated with cough, runny nose, and red eyes. The rash of tiny, red spots breaks out and starts at the head and spreads to the rest of the body.

How do I prevent anyone in my family from getting the measles? Get vaccinated!

Measles can be prevented with MMR vaccine, which protects against three diseases: measles, mumps, and rubella. The MMR vaccine can be given to children (12month or older), teens and adults.

Children may also get MMRV vaccine, which protects against measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (chickenpox). This vaccine is only licensed for use in children who are 12 months through 12 years of age. Please go to your child’s pediatrician for the MMRV vaccine.

How do I get vaccinated for Measles?

STAT MED Urgent Care offers the MMR vaccine in all of our San Francisco Bay Clinics: Concord, Dublin, Lafayette, and Livermore. No appointment is needed. If use our optional online registration system [link], please note that you are coming into the clinic for the vaccination.

Given the current high demand for the measles vaccine due to the increasing instances of exposure in California, you may want to call your local STAT MED Urgent Care clinic to confirm same day vaccine availability first. We are currently restocking as we run low so any wait should be minimal.

Who should get the MMR vaccine?

CDC recommends children get two doses of MMR vaccine, starting with the first dose at 12 through 15 months of age, and the second dose at 4 through 6 years of age. Teens and adults should also be up to date on their MMR vaccination.

According to the CCD, the MMR vaccine is very safe and effective. Two doses of MMR vaccine are about 97% effective at preventing measles; one dose is about 93% effective.

Most health insurance plans cover the cost of recommended vaccines. But you may want to check with your health insurance provider to verify.

 

Measles Info-graph from the CDCHow do I tell if I need the measles vaccine?

Start by checking your medical records, including your immunization records.

The CDC considers you protected from measles if you have written documentation (records) showing at least one of the following:

You received two doses of measles-containing vaccine, and you are:
a school-aged child (grades K-12)
an adult who will be in a setting that poses a high risk for measles transmission, including students at post-high school education institutions, healthcare personnel, and international travelers.

• You received one dose of measles-containing vaccine, and you are:
o a preschool-aged child
o an adult who will not be in a high-risk setting for measles transmission.

• A laboratory confirmed that you had measles at some point in your life.

• A laboratory confirmed that you are immune to measles. (This is typically done using a titer blood test)

• You were born before 1957. (Note: This is not a definitive test. It is a presumptive test based on fact that most people born before 1957 were not otherwise protected from measles and typically got it when exposed to measles and built their own immunity to measles. Typically if you are born before 1957 you should test positive for immune antibodies to measles.)

FAQ: What are the symptoms of measles?

• Fever
• Cough
• Runny nose
• Red, watery eyes
• Rash

FAQ: How long after exposure to measles does it take to show symptoms that I have the measles?

Measles has a long incubation period. It can take upwards of 7 to 21 days to show symptoms. If you suspect exposure to measles but don’t yet show signs of measles but are uncertain about your immunity to measles, call your primary physician. Your doctor is in the best position to review your medical records and advise on precautionary steps. Your doctor can make special arrangements to evaluate you, if needed, without putting other patients and medical office staff at risk.

FAQ: What should I do you do if I experience symptoms of the measles or suspect I have been exposed to the measles?

If you show signs of measles, the CDC says that you should Immediately call your doctor and let them know about your symptoms so that they can tell you what to do next. Your doctor can make special arrangements to evaluate you, if needed, without putting other patients and medical office staff at risk.

If you suspect exposure to measles but don’t yet show signs of measles, you should still call your primary physician. Your doctor is in the best position to review your medical records and advise on next steps.

Source: The CDC. For additional information about measles and the measles vaccine, please visit cdc.org/measles